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Malaysian Food Blog, Travel, Diving & More

Tag / egg

Have you ever heard about this term – “the curse of knowledge”?

The curse of knowledge is a cognitive bias that occurs when an individual, communicating with other individuals, unknowingly assumes that the others have the background to understand (wikipedia)

It is something I am always aware and try not to fall into when building this website, so for those of you who thinks this silly little recipe is too simple, well, there maybe others who could benefit from this.

So, I present you the very first dish I ever attempted as a kid, back when I was still in primary school – the Chinese style Omelette.

chinese style onion omelette

Ingredients:

  • two eggs
  • 2 red onions (small size), or 1 big ones, sliced
  • cooking oil
  • salt, pepper to taste

Instructions:

  • heat up frying pan with cooking oil (1 tablespoon)
  • throw in and cook onion till they’re soft, add a pinch of salt too
  • add in egg that’s pre-scrambled in a bowl, add some white pepper if desired
  • flip when one side is cooked
  • ready to serve!

I loved this dish so much as a kid, mom would make it probably almost weekly, and it goes very well especially with porridge as well, probably why this was the first dish I ever attempted as a kid (was a failure cos I put onion and egg the same time).

Try it yourself!

I think it’s about time we talk about pork noodle again, one of my favorite KL hawker dishes of all time. In the session, we look at perhaps the most well-known Chinese hawker stall in all of Brickfield – Peter’s Pork Noodle at Money’s Corner.

Peter's Pork Noodle at Money's Corner
Peter’s Pork Noodle at Money’s Corner

Money’s Corner is actually a kopitiam tucked within a paid car park directly opposite Nu Sentral on Jalan Tun Sambanthan. The google map entry on Money’s Corner is incorrect (at the time of writing – 22/11/2014) so do use the address provided on this post.

The good thing is, parking is never an issue, though visibility from main road is not exactly the best.

glorious pork noodle, I love to add the poached egg
glorious pork noodle, I love to add the poached egg

Peter’s pork noodle has been in operation for many years at the same location with a steady stream of customers from early in the morning till late afternoon.

A bowl of pork noodle is still under RM 5 (without egg), and you get to choose from koay teow, yellow noodle, meehun, or mee suah. All the combinations are good, except I do think they tend to over cook the mee suah so I would not recommend that option.

Ingredients are minced pork, pork slices, and liver. The broth sweet and savory, and of course, those bits of lard adds to the overall taste that you just can’t beat. I just wish that they also serve intestine or maybe pork liver though.

what can be better than a bowl of pork noodle before work?
what can be better than a bowl of pork noodle before work?

If you’re looking for a bowl of good pork noodle, you will definitely get your money’s worth from Peter’s, not to mention that it is still one of the better pork noodle stalls out there.

Other pork noodle places to check out will be SS3’s Kian Fatt and Imbi’s Weng Heng Seng kopitiam.

map to Money's Corner at Brickfield

Address:
Money’s Corner
Bricksfield,
Jalan Tun Sambanthan
Kuala Lumpur
GPS: 3.131352, 101.686575
Tel013-336 3953
Hours: breakfast till late lunch

Simple meal for two of bacon fried rice and red spinach soup. This is something that I cooked up last night because bacon was calling my name, and at the same time I wanted to fix something real quick instead of making elaborate dinners.

a complete meal - bacon fried rice and red spinach soup
a complete meal – bacon fried rice and red spinach soup

Total preparation and cooking time is about an hour, but that is because you need more than half that time to boil the chicken bones (for soup) and making rice in the first place. Actual active cooking takes place in less than 20 minutes.

The result is a satisfying meal that has has all your essential dietary needs (I think). There’s meat, egg, vegetable, soup, and rice. As an Asian, that’s all I need. 😀

bacon is the key ingredient here, obviously
bacon is the key ingredient here, obviously

Recipe for two plates of bacon fried rice, ingredients:

  • streaky bacon (150-200 grams), cut them in squares
  •  half a bulb of garlic, chop em up
  • 2 eggs
  • rice for two person (I cooked 1.5 cups)
  • chili padi (optional)
  • 1 table spoon of dark soya sauce
  • 2 stalks of spring onion, chopped
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • minimal cooking oil

open up the rice and crack a couple eggs in there, stir
open up the rice and crack a couple eggs in there, stir

Instructions:

  • heat up a table spoon of cooking oil (you don’t need much since bacon will release more oil)
  • fry bacon, garlic, and chili padi at the same time till bacon is cooked and garlic is fragrant
  • add rice, dark soya sauce, stir
  • after 3-4 minutes, open up the fried rice at center, add half a spoon of oil and crack the two eggs into it
  • let the egg cooked for a bit before stirring it with fried rice for another 3-4 minutes
  • add spring onion, salt & pepper and keep stirring for another minute or two
  • serve while hot

spinach soup is about the simplest soup you can make
the red spinach soup is real simple to prepare

Ingredients and instructions:

  • wash red spinach with plenty of water and pluck off the stems
  • boil 3 bowls of water with chicken bones, wolf berries optional (you might want to pre-boil once to remove impurities, I use chicken bones from chicken chop cut)
  • I boil it while rice is cooking, that took about 45 minutes
  • add red spinach, keep boiling for another 15 minutes (while frying rice)
  • add salt and a bit of pepper and it’s ready to be served

Do check out other recipes if these are thing stuff you like to eat, they are usually pretty simple to prepare. Good eating!

This is one of the fastest soup to prepare that is perfect to clear up sinus problem – the mint and egg soup. Everything can be done in about 10-15 minutes, and makes a perfect companion to another dish, or even to be consumed just by itself.

I’ve always thought that making the mint and egg soup means chucking everything into the pot and just boil away. As it turns out, the process involves a few more steps in between, and here’s how you do it:

the two main ingredients - mint leaves and egg
the two main ingredients – mint leaves and egg

Ingredients (for two as companion dish):

  • a bunch of mint leaves – pluck and use only the leaves
  • 1 egg – lightly beaten
  • ginger – in strips
  • 3-4 cloves garlic
  • 1 teaspoon oil
  • half a chicken cube (or soup stock if you have)
  • salt and pepper for seasoning

with some oil, fry ginger, garlic, then the mint leaves
with some oil, fry ginger, garlic, then the mint leaves

Cooking instructions:

  • with a pot, heat up cooking oil then fry ginger as it takes longer to cook
  • a minute or two later, add in garlic
  • when garlic is fragrant, add mint leaves, stir till you can smell the mints, around 1-2 minutes
  • add egg, and cook it to the consistency of soft scrambled egg
  • add 1.5 bowl of water and chicken cube (or soup stock)
  • bring to boil, add salt and pepper  according to taste

make a scramble egg, almost, then add water and chicken cube
make a scramble egg, almost, then add water and chicken cube

So there you go, 2 small bowls of mint and egg soup ready to serve. The frying process, together with the addition of ginger and garlic really brings out the flavor of the soup. The only little tricky part with the mint soup is that mint leaves generally doesn’t last very long in the fridge before turning black and bad. You should always cook it at the lastest 1-2 days after purchasing for best results.

Get cooking! There are more recipes here.

and it's ready to serve after boiling for a couple minutes
and it’s ready to serve after boiling for a couple minutes

P/S: the recipe for prawn dish on the photo above is here.

Egg, telur,  蛋, easily one of the most important foods in our everyday diet. We gotta respect the first prehistoric human who looked at the egg and said “I’m gonna eat that liquid chicken!”

From that fateful day many thousands of years ago until very recently, the production, preparation, and consumption of eggs hasn’t really changed that much. Until now..

safe eggs launch
so when is an egg not an ordinary egg?

But before we get to that, here’re some trivia on eggs that you might find interesting:

  • Malaysians eat an aeverage of 305 eggs per person per year
  • The longest throw of a fresh egg without breaking it is 98.51 meters
  • The older the hen, the larger the egg
  • A fresh egg will sink in water while an older egg will stand up.
  • The average hen will lay an average of 300-325 eggs a year, taking 24-26 hours to lay a single egg
  • A raw egg will wobble and a cooked egg will spin freely if you spin it
  • It is estimated that there are 4.93 billion egg-laying hens in the world. China is the world’s largest egg producer with approximately 20.25 million tonnes
  • The only pasteurized eggs sold in Malaysia are “Safegg” from Safe Food Corporation, available now at all leading hypermarkets

safe eggs launch
Healthy Living talk show, and the launch of Safegg

Last week I was invited to attend the “Healthy Living” talk show with the launch and cooking demonstration of Safeegg, which brings us to the latest method of egg production and preparation – pasteurized shell eggs.

The talk show and speeches were given by YB Datuk Hajjah Rohani Haji Abdul Karim, the deputy minister of Agriculture and Agro-Based Industry, Yong-Sik Cho, CEO of Safe Food Corporation (SFC), Professor Gulam Rusul Rahmat Ali, University Sains Malaysia, and Maverick Lee, MD of SFC, and Mr. Kong Vee Hong, GM of SFC (I went to uni with him back in the States!)

Salmonella bacteria
the nasty Salmonella bacteria

The picture above shows the nasty Salmonella bacteria under electron microscope, this is the very bacteria that infect 142,000 Americans and causes some 30 death yearly. Basically one of the major causes of food poisoning that leads to diarrhea, dehydration, and in more severe cases, death.

This nasty stuff can be found in contaminated egg whites, you don’t really want to mess with it.

egg cooking demonstration
Safegg live cooking demonstration

To be honest, before attending this event, I didn’t even know that pasteurization of shelled eggs even existed. The technology is actually from Korea to treat bacteria at low temperature, without the need of chemicals. During the process, the eggs are also coated with a protective layer of food grade mineral oil to prevent cross-contamination and keep the eggs fresh longer.

Through this method, harmful salmonella bacteria are killed but the nutritional value and tastes of the eggs remain.

The tell tale sign of a pasteurized egg is that the egg white appears to be slightly opaque instead of completely transparent.

love the eggnog
the eggnog was absolutely fantastic

After the show, we proceeded to the Safegg cooking demonstration where I helped myself to a few omelete, “mata kerbau”, desserts, and that addictive eggnog. They were delish!

Safegg is now available at all major hypermarkets in the country.