Sometimes the best eateries are the one you stumbled upon when the original place you want to go isn’t opened for business, and this was precisely how we ended up at Hong Lai at Setapak after a failed attempt to get go Restoran Sup & Popiah Zaiton Hussin for some good old fashion sup lidah (ox tongue soup).

Hong Lai hokkien mee at Setapak
Hong Lai hokkien mee at Setapak

To be honest, when we were at Hong Lai, we had no idea what to order and basically just glanced at the other tables. We ended up with hokkien mee  (福建面) and yin yeong (鸳鸯), which turned out to be a decent choice, but missed out their speciality (which I read at a later time) – moonlight noodle (月光河)

yin yeong and fried hokkien mee
yin yeong and fried hokkien mee

Over here good old fashioned charcoal fire is used, which some swore produced the best “wok hei”. I guess there’s some sense of truth to it as charcoal often manage to heat up the wok to much higher temperature.

The hokkien mee tasted decent if not a little less elastic than I’m used to, you can see that they get chopped up to smaller strands in the (rather poor quality) picture above. The yin yeong though, was excellent! The crispy fried portion with those flavorful brothy wet portion mixed well to give an explosion of texture and flavor that can only be described as a perfect match, we were surprised in a good way.

Haze & KY for some supper goodness
Haze & KY for some supper goodness

Now we just need an excuse to be there for their moonlight noodle.

Hong Lai opens for dinner and supper, and you’ll be able to dine here until a couple hours past midnight, which is convenient for those after-clubbing hunger pangs.

map to Hong Lai hokkien mee, Setapak

Address:
Kedai Kopi Dan Makanan Hong Lai
83, Jalan Genting Klang
Setapak, Kuala Lumpur
GPS3.192163, 101.709022
Hours: 6:30pm-2:30am

KY eats – Hong Lai Fried Hokkien Mee, Setapak
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23 thoughts on “KY eats – Hong Lai Fried Hokkien Mee, Setapak

  • Pingback:KYspeaks | KY eats – Hong Lai Fried Hokkien Mee, Setapak | SETAPAK Info

  • February 4, 2016 at 7:34 am
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    I don’t recall eating any of those short fat noodles before. They look like something I’d like if the texture was good.

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    • February 8, 2016 at 11:11 am
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      The Yum List: you should give it a try!

      Reply
  • February 4, 2016 at 9:04 am
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    wahh… fireworks always mean serious fried noodle bizzness

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  • February 4, 2016 at 9:43 am
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    KY, is the Hokkien noodle like udon noodle? I never got a chance to taste Hokkien noodle and there hardly anywhere in San Francisco that have it. I like it for they use dark soy sauce which make it different from other noodle dishes.

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    • February 8, 2016 at 11:12 am
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      Vickie: it’s very close to udon in terms of texture and size, they do taste slightly different.

      Reply
  • February 4, 2016 at 12:21 pm
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    ooo, i remember the first time i ever had moonlight noodles – it was actually in your home state of penang 😀

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  • February 4, 2016 at 3:07 pm
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    I can see some serious sparks flying off the charcoal flame….which is always a good sign for wok fried noodles! 😀 I wonder why the hokkien noodles are cut up like that…I don’t like it that way though.

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    • February 8, 2016 at 11:13 am
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      eatwhateatwhere: yeah, that’s always a great sign isn’t it?

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  • February 4, 2016 at 3:15 pm
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    Got PORK or not?

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    • February 5, 2016 at 7:08 am
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      must have juu yao jaaaaaa

      Reply
  • February 5, 2016 at 11:38 am
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    That yin yeong caught my attention. Used to have that when I was in KL in the 80’s, called it Cantonese fried mee, did not know the name. Pretty nice, one place at PJ Old Town – I would go there all the time. Gee!!! Haven’t had it for years now! Drool!!!

    Reply
    • February 8, 2016 at 11:14 am
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      suituapui: didn’t realise this dish isn’t in Sibu.

      Reply
  • February 9, 2016 at 7:06 am
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    Gung Hei Gung Hei, Uncle. May your swimmer prosper this year.

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    • February 18, 2016 at 12:49 pm
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      immature: thank you young man (or lady), gong xi fa cai to you too

      Reply
      • February 22, 2016 at 9:59 am
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        kek…. uncle thinks i got v jayjay

        Reply
  • February 15, 2016 at 11:43 am
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    From sup lidah to Hokkien Mee…very much different wor, haah!

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    • February 18, 2016 at 12:59 pm
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      Choi Yen: haha no choice lor second option ma.

      Reply
  • March 6, 2016 at 2:39 pm
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    Next time ajak la. I stay across the road nia. XD

    Reply

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