Kyspeaks.com

Malaysian Food Blog, Travel, Diving & More

Tag / stew pork

Vietnam is the country I traveled to the most times thanks to my previous job, and while I don’t miss that role too much, one thing that I’ve always missed was some awesome Vietnamese cuisine, which seems to be living in Thai food’s shadow when it comes to offerings from South East Asia.

Over the last few years though, it has starting to make headrooms, perhaps in parallel of the country’s economic expansion, definitely a good thing for those of us who loves variety.

Pho Vietz at Atria Shopping Gallery, almost always packed
Pho Vietz at Atria Shopping Gallery, almost always packed

Quick shopping trip at Empire Subang. Pho Vietz it is then, banh mi, and Vietnamese style tiger prawn in sour soup. @hazelong thinks cafe su da is good for her at this hour, we'll see. #kyeats #vietnamesefood #nonhalal #empiremall #phovietz

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One of the latest Vietnamese restaurant that is fast gaining popularity is Pho Vietz at Atria (and now also at Empire Mall Subang). The place is almost perpetually packed, and it’s not difficult to see why, they serve pretty good food in a modern and comfortable setting while being reasonable in price.

Most importantly, it is also one of the very few proper Vietnamese restaurant that offers pork.

traditional spring role, baguette, banh mi
traditional spring role, baguette, banh mi

The menu is pretty extensive, there’s snacks such as spring roles, banh mi (baguette), several types of pho, vermicelli, ho fun, and different rice plates with curry, pork/beef stew, and clay pot dishes.

We’ve been to the place twice and tried several of their dishes. The prawn role (RM 8.50) was decent but I found the skin a bit too tough for my liking.

Banh Mi, or baguette (RM 9.90 or 10.90) with pork was an absolute treat with really crispy exterior and soft, airy bread within. It is like Subway but twice as good, especially if you love the mixture of yummy pork and those slightly sweetish sauce with plenty of vegetable. You can also have the baguette separately to go with beef stew (RM 17.90).

pho, stew beef with baguette, spring role with vermicelli
pho, stew beef with baguette, spring role with vermicelli

The standard pho (RM 17.90) here had a good soup base and pretty fresh, delicious slices of beef. We asked for more basil and bean sprouts and the restaurant gladly supplied a full plate of greens. That being said, I wished they had beef tendon though.

For those who wants even more greens, the Vietnamese Spring Role Vermicelli (RM 14.90) will not disappoint. There’s basil, mint, cucumber, carrot, bean sprout, and all sorts of healthy bits in the bowl.

caramel sliced pork belly with rice, KY, Haze, Johnson
caramel sliced pork belly with rice, KY, Haze, Johnson

On my second visit, I had the Caramel Sliced Pork Belly with Rice (RM 19.90) which quickly turned out to be one of my favorites. The “3 layer” belly was properly marinated and perfectly cooked, it was rather strong tasting so finishing the whole bowl of rice is a definite plus. If you’re a pork lover, you’ll definitely enjoy this.

If you’re a fan of Vietnamese food, this is definitely a decent hang-out, just don’t go there during peak lunch/dinner hours and expect to have your food served quickly (or get a table immediately for that matter).

atria shopping gallery map

Address:
Pho Vietz
T08 & T09,
Atria Shopping Gallery
Damansara Jaya,

Jalan SS 22/23,
47400 Petaling Jaya, Selangor
GPS3.127261, 101.616595
Tel03-7731 3020

Tiffin’s by Chef Korn is a little restaurant located at the Mezzanine floor of North Court at Mid Valley, which is rather hidden from plain view unless you purposely walk up to the newish hidden area of the mall a level above the GSC cinemas (but at opposite end).

Tiffin by Chef Korn at Mid Valley Megamall

The restaurant is an offshoot of Erawan, considered as one of the best Thai restaurants in town by many (I haven’t had to opportunity to try it out myself yet), to be a more accessible outlet to the general public by the same Chef Korn Yodsuk.

The menu consists of mostly Thai street food offerings, but with higher grade ingredients and sometimes a bit of a unique twist. The restaurant does serve pork and is definitely not halal.

beef ball noodles with Thai iced tea
beef ball noodles with Thai iced tea

For our impromptu lunch for two, I ordered the stew pork knuckle rice (RM 19.80) while Haze had the beef ball noodle (RM 25.80). We also ordered the grilled pork neck for sharing (RM 23.80).

The grilled pork neck is served with homemade sauce and glutinous rice, and I reckon it’ll be a fantastic dish to go with beer or wine, and if you really finish up the glutinous rice, it could probably make it as a standalone meal as well. We really liked it.

Stew pork knuckle stayed true to the street cred that it should have, except for the portion being larger than what you’d find by the roadside in Bangkok. There’s also preserved vegetable, kailan, and egg with the pork.

stew pork knuckle rice & grilled pork neck
stew pork knuckle rice & grilled pork neck

The beef ball noodle includes Australian tender shin meat, poach beef, and beef balls in a homemade recipe broth by Chef Korn. It was certainly different from your run-off-the-mill beef noodle, but one that perhaps take a while to fully appreciate.

The prices at Chef Korn is on the higher side compared to the likes of Go Thai and other such Thai Street food restaurants, but the quality of you get in return does make it a fair exchange.

If you’re up for some non-halal Thai food, this would be one of the places to check out.

Other dishes found here includes tomyam noodle, pork noodle, green curry, pineapple fried rice, and more.

Address:
Tiffin by Chef Korn
T068 & T069, 3rd Floor,
Mezzanine (North Court)
Lingkaran Syed Putra,
Mid Valley City, 58000 Kuala Lumpur
GPS3.118675, 101.676085
Tel: 03-5501 7368

One of my favorite canned food is the stewed canned pork. It is basically savory heaven contained within a can that can be unleashed upon in the kitchen at your convenience throughout the clock. If I had to build a nuclear bunker, this will definitely be one of the stocked up item for me.

Today, I’m going to share with you one of the easiest ways to make use of this godsend ingredient – by making canned stew pork with potato dish that goes very well with steamed rice.

cooking potato with canned pork
cooking potato with canned pork

Ingredients:

  • one canned stew pork (big)
  • 3 potatoes, cut in 1/2 cm thick slices
  • 2-3 cloves of garlic, smashed
  • 1 tablespoon cooking oil
  • 1 tablespoon dark soya sauce (optional)

potato with stewed pork
potato with stewed pork

Cooking instructions:

  • boil the potato until soft
  • heat up cooking oil and fry garlic until fragrant
  • add canned pork, add potato
  • add dark soya sauce (optional)
  • mix well and serve while hot

This dish can be prepared in less than 20 minutes, super simple and positively delicious. Give it a try if you like some of those homey cholesterol laden taste.

Happy cooking!

One of the many wonderful dishes that mom makes when we were a kid involves fatty pork and meehun, and whenever she cooked them, we would finish it in record time. The succulent and overly savory pork with those soft vermicelli never disappoint, and I’m glad to say that I finally manage to do it at our own kitchen.

I present to you – fried meehun with canned stew pork, the sin food.

ingredients - meehun, vege, garlic, canned pork, chili padi
ingredients – meehun, vege, garlic, canned pork, chili padi

The ingredients are plenty simple and should be available from just about anywhere in the world with an Asian/Chinese grocery store.

Ingredients:

  • canned stew pork
  • choi sam (or any leafy vegetable)
  • half a clove of garlic
  • chili padi if you like it spicy
  • mushroom (optional)
  • 2 tablespoon cooking oil
  • soya sauce to taste
  • dark soya sauce (1 teaspoon)

fry the greens first
fry the greens first, then the pork

Cooking Instructions:

  • soak meehun in water for 30 minutes (or until soft)
  • heat up the cooking oil and fry garlic until fragrant
  • add vegetables (always add the stems first as they take longer to cook) and cook for a couple minutes
  • add canned pork and stir for a minute
  • add meehun, chili padi, soya sauce, and dark soya sauce
  • stir, and close the lid of frying pan for a minute to steam and avoid losing too much moisture
  • serve while hot!

add some soya sauce & dark soya sauce, then steam it a bit
add some soya sauce & dark soya sauce, then steam it a bit

The recipe is fairly simple and you really can’t go wrong. A big can of stew pork is probably good enough for four portions of meehun, do use appropriately sized frying pan for this job. We cooked for only 2 of us so the amount of pork we ended up consuming was a bit too insane.

fried mihun with canned stew pork, mom's recipe
fried mihun with canned stew pork, mom’s recipe

Happy cooking, and feel free to check out other recipes on this space too.