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Tag / siem reap

For Chinese New Year of 2020, we decided to head to Siem Reap for a short family getaway, while we may not necessarily enjoyed the local food at the Old Market that much, one thing that did not disappoint was the visit to Angkor Wat.

Monks at Angkor Wat, Siem Reap
Monks at Angkor Wat, Siem Reap

For those who prefer moving pictures and some of my mumbling, the three minute video below shows our experience at Angkor Wat, though for the other four temples I’ve only taken photos in the interest of not having it overly long winded (that and who’s got time to edit all those clips!).

We pre-booked our tour earlier via many of the online website and asked for a tuktuk driver for a day. The package includes visit to five different temples and lasts some 6-7 hours (or until you give up due to heat).

As scheduled, our guide picked us up at 8 in the morning.

tickets will have your face printed
tickets will have your face printed

Our first destination was to the ticket counter building, some 20 minutes away from Siem Reap city center.

Ticket was at a cool USD $37 per pax for a day pass, $2 goes to some education fund apparently. We each had to have our pictures taken and printed on the ticket as their semi high tech way of ensuring tickets are not transferable. Fair enough.

Angkor Wat, since the 12th century
Angkor Wat, since the 12th century

Our tour includes the following temples:

  • Angkor Wat
  • Bayon
  • Ba phuon
  • Ta prohm
  • Banteay kdei

Bayon temple, with lots of smiling stone faces
Bayon temple, with lots of smiling stone faces

Angkor Wat was obviously the most famous site, with the huge body of water surrounding it, you’ll need to walk through the temporary floating bridge to get to the temple. For those who wants to have those iconic sunrise/sunset photos, you’d have to book a separate type of tour instead, we obviously did not do that.

Ba phuon with the "sleeping buddha"
Ba phuon with the “sleeping buddha”

Bayon temple was our next destination. It was famous for having a lot of stone faces. Thank goodness that they are all smiling, otherwise this could make for an interesting night time visit on a daring mission (though unfortunately you can’t get there at night..)

yeap, expect some really steep steps
yeap, expect some really steep steps at Ba Phuon

Next up was Ba Phuon where we also encountered some monkeys, and a lot of really steep steps if you’re adventurous enough to get all the way up to the top. The view was not overly impressive, but a view nonetheless. What was more impressive though was the “sleeping buddha” made of stone blocks at one side of the temple, barely recognizable due to years of erosion.

Lunch break at Banana Tree (overpriced and lousy)
Lunch break at Banana Tree (overpriced and lousy)

Our guide then took us to this tourist trap of a lunch place called Banana Tree, where we had our first “amok fish”, a dish I could only described as someone trying to make otak-otak and gives up half way.

Food was again overly sweet, and too pricey for what we got. Didn’t blame the tuktuk driver much.. “cari makan” lor.

Ta Prohm, with trees growing out of the ruins
Ta Prohm, with trees growing out of the ruins

Next temple was a proper ruins made famous by Lara Croft & Tomb Raider. In fact, the guide just called it the Tomb Raider temple..

Trees growing out of crumbling stone buildings, do expect line of tourists all wanting to take photos at the same first tree spots. My advise is, walk a little deeper and there’ll be less of a wait.

Banteay Kdei - A Citadel of Chambers
Banteay Kdei – A Citadel of Chambers

Our last spot was Bantaey Kdei, and to be perfectly honest, things start to look a little bit like they’re repeating itself. Also, the afternoon heat on a dry season-day starts to take its toll.

yeap, a hat is good, umbrella is better, and wear your sunscreen
yeap, a hat is good, umbrella is better, and wear your sunscreen

To me, one day is just nice for touring Angkor and its temples unless you’re a hardcore history fan. If you do plan to go there, bring an umbrella, plenty of sunscreen, and water to drink.

For this year’s CNY escape, my brother & I brought mom to Siem Reap for some Angkor Wat sight seeing. So naturally, we got to try some of the local foods.

I always thought it was a little strange that we can find many representations of South East Asian food in Malaysia – Thai being most popular, but you can also find Indonesian, Vietnamese, and to a lesser extend, Filipino food. However, I haven’t seen a single Cambodian hawker stall or restaurants in all of Klang Valley, and now I think I know why..

Old Market at Siem Reap
Old Market at Siem Reap

The short answer is – Cambodian food is just not very good.. or rather, they don’t appeal to the Malaysian taste at all. The biggest problem being that most everything ended up to sweet, even dishes that you never expect to have any sugar at all, they will add some just for kicks in Siem Reap.

So, if you order food there and specifically tell them not to put any sugar, things usually will turn out OK-ish.

Even though it’s the second biggest city in Cambodia, Siem Reap is really quite a small place, with population of only around 200 thousands. You can use local currency, but US dollar is accepted anywhere with a rate of around 1000 Cambodian Riel to 1 USD,  I’d suggest using US dollar for your travel here.

Our first meal was at the Old Market at the heart of the city, walking distance from our hotel (there are many around the area at varying price range).

Instinctively, we went for the busiest noodle/rice stall in the market.

brunch for three, rice or noodle for you?
brunch for three, rice or noodle for you?

We ended up ordering 3 different dishes – vermicelli with pork, “instant” noodle with beef, and a plate of chicken rice. Ordering wasn’t too difficult since they do have English menu, and each dish cost US $2. Probably cheaper for the locals? Not sure.

Taste wise they were pretty decent, I particularly love the pork blood and vege in the soup. The soup base however, was a tad too sweet, though still quite acceptable, unlike some of the other stalls we tried at later meals.

I’d not shy away from eating at this stall again.

the dessert stall is right next to noodle stall
the dessert stall is right next to noodle stall

Right next to the noodle stall is this very popular dessert stall operated by a lady who doesn’t really speak any English.

Since Siem Reap food is already too sweet, it follows the logic that they would be pretty good at dishes that should be sweet, right? And after having been convinced by some instagram friends who urged me to try it out, we did, and it was awesome!

desserts for three
desserts for three

We had no idea what these desserts were called, or what they really were other than knowing grass jelly, coconut milk, sago, banana, condensed milk and the likes were involved. These 3 bowls cost us 5,500 Riel, they were sweet, tasty, and absolutely satisfying.

If you’re at Old Market, check it out.

siem reap old market map

Address:
Old Market (Psar Chas)
2 Thnou St,
Krong Siem Reap, Cambodia
GPS: 13.353874, 103.855226