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Malaysian Food Blog, Travel, Diving & More

Tag / lard

After attending the Time Out Food Awards at KLPAC (a couple weeks ago), a few of us decided to have supper (or actually, dinner, since we didn’t really have a meal at the event). Boo of masak-masak suggested Sentul Ah Yap Hokkien mee, which was a great location since we were already at Sentul, and Hokkien mee for late night?

Awesome choice if you ask me, nothing beats some starch, pork, seafood, and lard near midnight.

restuarant Ah Yap Hokkien mee at Sentul
restuarant Ah Yap Hokkien mee at Sentul, Jon & Isadora

While the premise of Sentul Ah Yap Hokkien mee is now a pretty nice corner shop lot with air conditioned as well as al fresco style dining areas, every plate of Hokkien mee is still prepared with good old charcoal fire, exactly the same as when it was just a stall in the nearby kopitiam. (there are even other branches now).

Many believes that Hokkien Mee is best fried using charcoal fire, and that there is a distinctive difference in taste when preapred with gas vs charcoal. For me though, I’m not quire sure, I like it when it tastes good, and frankly doesn’t care too much about the romantic idea of having it old school or modern. If it tastes good, it’s fine by me if it was gas, coal, charcoal, or wood fire.

the old school hokkien mee, made with charcoal fire
the old school hokkien mee, made with charcoal fire

Our Hokkien mee  (RM 12) was quite awesome, there were no surprises – big fat noodle, meehun (we asked for it), prawns, slices of fish cake, pork slices, vegetable, and of course, pork lard.

It really did taste as good as it looks, and made better when Isadora asked for extra lard for us. :D

butter chicken, marmaid pork ribs, extra pork lard, and tapioka hokkien mee
butter chicken, marmaid pork ribs, extra pork lard, and tapioka hokkien mee

Other than the Hokkien Mee, we also ordered marmite pork ribs, butter chicken, bitter gourd with salted egg yolk, and another plate of special Hokkien mee made with tapioka noodle.

The marmite ribs (RM 23) were frankly speaking, way too skinny. It would probably be a dream come true for those who loves lean meat, but we weren’t really impressed.

Butter chicken (RM 23) was a pretty decent dish though, flavorful with pretty nice texture to go with. The bitter gourd with salted egg yolk (RM 20) though, was my favorite for the night. The combination of the bitterness and the richness of salted egg yolk, in a weird sort of cosmic logic, worked well for our palates. This is a dish that needs to be tasted to be impressed.

As for the tapioka noodle Hokkien Mee (RM 16), well, imagine the texture of bubble tea pearls, except flattened and served in a plate of Hokkien mee ingredients. I wouldn’t say it was bad, bit it was a bit too chewy for my liking. A novelty perhaps, but not something I would order again.

Ah Yap Sentul Hokkien Mee map

The Hokkien mee at Ah Yap is certainly worth eating, the other dishes however, was a bit of a hit and miss, and does not really offer very good value for money either. I’d stick with having the original Hokkien mee and that sinful bitter gourd with salted egg yolk here.

Address:
Sentul Ah Yap Hokkien Mee
744, Jalan Sentul,
51000 Kuala Lumpur

GPS: 3.178117, 101.692436
Tel : 012-3036800, 012-2816862
opening hours are from 5 p.m – 1 a.m

Olympus E-PL3

To those who loves a good bowl of Loh Mee, Ulu Yam is undoubtedly what springs in mind. For those who has never heard about Ulu Yam, it is sort of a half way point between KL and Fraser Hill, within Batang Kali.

You can also go to Genting via Ulu Yam if you’re the sort who enjoys a bit of spirited driving on winding roads with good scenery, though the journey takes quite a bit longer (and further) compared to the standard toll way.

Swee Yen restaurant at Ulu Yam Lama
Swee Yen restaurant at Ulu Yam Lama

A couple weekends ago Haze and I had a little getaway at Fraser’s Hill, and since I have yet to try the famous loh mee, we decided to do just that on a pit stop before heading back to KL.

The only problem about finding Loh Mee in Ulu Yam is that.. which one?! It is almost like the case of Klang bak kut teh or Ampang yong tau foo where a relatively small area is littered with several outlets offering essentially the same thing, you have to know which one to choose.

There were different recommendations from Garmin GPS, Google Maps, and blogs. I settled on Kim’s blog entry. If it’s good enough for her mom, it will be good enough for me.

glorious lor mee, look at the lard!
glorious lor mee, look at the lard!

Since there were just two of us, we ordered a bowl of Loh Mee for two and a lala with superior soup as side order.

The Loh Mee were huge (I think people Ulu Yam must eat only 1 meal a day or something), and true to the reputation, it was fantastic!

There’s a pretty strong taste of vinegar in the thick soup but in a good way. There were also bits of fried lard, some prawns, and meat to complete the dish. It’s easily one of the best Central style Loh Mee I’ve tried.

lala in superior soup
lala in superior soup

Then there’s the lala in superior soup. This too didn’t come in a small dish, and would probably be a serving for 4 in KL. The shellfish were quite big and juicy, with the superior soup carrying a kick thanks to the addition of chili padi and a healthy dose of ginger with plenty of coriander.

Good stuff.

check out the huge portion of lor mee
check out the huge portion of lor mee

It was definitely a very satisfying lunch and we didn’t even manage to finish everything, the servings were just too big.

The bill came to RM 33 for everything, including drinks too. Glad that crazy inflation hasn’t hit small town as bad yet. I’m gonna go there again next time and order terrapin! :D

map to ulu yam lor mee

Address:
Swee Yen Restaurant
No 38, Jalan Besar, Ulu Yam Lama,
43300 Batang Kali,
Selangor Darul Ehsan
GPS: 3.4546, 101.64073
Tel: 03-6075 1123, 012-360 4837

The Bukit Bintang area in KL gives an impression of luxury and all that is modern, however, tucked just behind Starhill exists some of the most old school of places you’d find anywhere in this country.

note: This kopitiam is now a restaurant, no more hawker stalls

One of these hidden is the kopitiam with an unorthodox name – Blue White Teow Chew Porridge

say hello to Jenny, she is a Sarawakian
say hello to Jenny, she is a Sarawakian

So when Jenny (Irene’s sister whom we went to Sipadan dive trip last year) came to KL and had her fair share of food court and franchised restaurants, I suggested that we head to this kopitiam for some old fashion pork noodle, one of my favorite hawker dishes.

traditional pork noodle with all the good stuff, RM 5
traditional pork noodle with all the good stuff, RM 5

The pork noodle comes with either dry or soup version at RM 5 a pop. There’s plenty of pork slices, minced pork, liver, and intestine. Some vegetable, scallion, fried shallots, and fried lard in a sweet and pretty tasty broth.

The difference between the two versions is of course, the soup version has the noodle (choices of vermicelli, kueh teow, yellow noodle, or meesuah) in soup, while the dry version has the noodle served separately with some dark soya based sauce and more scallions.

comes in dry version too, and of course extra lard for those with suicidal intents
comes in dry version too, and of course extra lard for those with suicidal intent

map to Blue White Teow Chew Porridge Kopitiam

I love both versions just the same, the kopitiam gets quite packed at typical lunch hours so do try to avoid the 1pm curse. Oh, it’s pretty warm in there too so don’t be wearing your jackets!

Address:
Blue White Teow Chew Porridge Kopitiam
Jalan Gading, 55100 Kuala Lumpur
GPS3.14622, 101.71415

As I was browsing the food map created by yours truly (if you don’t know what I mean, just look at the frigging thing on the right sidebar, I’ve spent lotsa time and effort to create it so make use if it gahhh! ops I digress.. ), I realized there’s a huge chunk of area devoid of any entries and yet famous for food among Klang Valley dwellers – OUG.

Hence, in order to gain some street cred, I’ve decided to venture into this side of Klang Valley that’s relatively unknown to me. This time with the help of Haze (who somehow knows the way around OUG and basically not many other places)

Restaurant Hong Cha at Old Klang
Restaurant Hong Cha at OUG

So a few days ago we headed over to OUG for dinner and ended up at Hong Cha Restaurant since the initial plan of curry mee did not work out (the restaurant was closed. Lately I’ve not had luck with a couple curry mee places I tried to eat, always closed goddamn, but lest I digress again..)

Restaurant Hong Cha is a pretty busy joint at OUG offering an unlikely combination of foods – pork noodle, seafood noodle, and interestingly – simple Japanese dishes. Since I rather have my Japanese food from proper Japanese joints, the session was confined to their pork and seafood noodle.

seafood noodle with lotsa lard!
seafood noodle with extra lard!

To be honest, the seafood noodle and the pork noodle actually kinda overlapped each other quite a bit. In the seafood noodle you have lard, and in the pork noodle there’s prawns. Even the soup tasted quite similar – in this case, similarly awesome! The soup was rich, savory, salty, and very tasty, yums!

I had my seafood noodle in soup version with mee suah and it was loaded with quite a bit of squid, fish paste, fish, and prawns. they’re not exactly big in size but it also only costs some RM 5.50 or 6.50. And oh, you can ask for basically unlimited lard if you’re willing to walk over and self serve!

seafood noodle and pork noodle at Hong Cha
seafood noodle and pork noodle at Hong Cha

Haze ordered a dried version of pork noodle and reported to be very happy with it too! Pork slices, minced pork, liver, and even a few smallish prawns to add a bit more sweetness to the soup. Very addictive.

Haze and KY, old school dining
Haze and KY, old school dining, OUG

The dinner ended up to be something like RM 14 or so inclusive of drinks. As you can imagine, with excellent value and equally awesome food, this place is pretty busy, but they have the help of technology though – ordering is done via wireless PDA!

How’s that for progress?

This place is a must-try if you’re a lard lover.

map to Hong Cha at Old Klang

Address:
Restaurant Hong Cha
No 7, Jalan Hujan Rahmat 3,
OUG, 58200 Kuala Lumpur

GPS: 3.073334, 101.672083
Tel: 012-350 6755

Hong Cha Restaurant

Most everyone who are originally from Penang is a fan of Char Kueh Teow, myself included. While this particular dish hasn’t really found its rival outside the island, there are actually several places right here in Klang Valley that are certainly more than good enough to satisfy my cravings from time to time.

Robert char kueh teow at say huat
Robert Char Kueh Teow at Restaurant Say Huat

I’ve heard and read about Robert Char Kueh Teow quite for quite a while, but for whatever reason the few kopitiams at Seksyen 17 remains to be pretty unexplored to me.

I got the cravings again the other day, and this time I made it a point to head over to this famed stall.

Char Kueh Teow
glistering char kueh teow with prawns and lap cheong

The stall is located amongst the dozen of so other offerings within restaurant Say Huat with the friendly owner, Robert, busy frying away. I made our orders, 2 plates of Char Kueh Teow with everything.

Some 10 minutes later, we got our servings. The plate of Char Kueh Teow comes with all the ingredients: flat noodle, bean sprouts, chives, prawns, lap cheong (Chinese sausage), egg, tiny bits of salted vegetable, and of course, lard too.

KY and Haze
KY and Haze enjoying char kueh teow

I must say that Robert CKT lives up to the expectations. The combination of all the classic ingredients, and the availability of pork lard of course contributed to the overall “original” Penang CKT taste. Now if only they could add massive prawns….

map to restaurant say huat, PJ seksyen 17

Address:
Restaurant Say Huat
1083, Jalan 17/29

46400 Selangor
GPS: 3.128818, 101.635305