Kyspeaks.com

Malaysian Food Blog, Travel, Diving & More

Tag / deep fried

Most of my raw seafood are sourced from mom, who works at a wet market in Penang. She’d pack them frozen in layers of newspaper so that they remain as such during the journey back to KL. The interesting part is, I usually never really know what I’m getting.

So the latest shipment includes squid, one of my favorite seafood, but also one that I have little experience in preparing. I scouted around the internet a little bit and came up with this recipe of deep fried butter squid, an inspiration from several sources, and some personal preference in taste.

end result: deep fried butter squid, yum yum
home made deep fried butter squid, yum yum

This dish takes a little longer and more steps than most my other recipes, but the end result turned out pretty good, definitely worth the effort and it’ll be something that I shall make again.

Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoon rice flour
  • 3 tablespoon corn flour
  • 1 tablespoon black pepper
  • 1 egg (beaten)
  • squid (300-500 gram)
  • 1 inch ginger
  • half a bulb of garlic (you can have more)
  • 2 red/green chili
  • salt to taste
  • 2 tablespoon butter
  • vegetable oil for deep frying

ingredients - squid, flour, egg
ingredients – squid, flour, egg

cooking instruction 1 (deep frying):

  • mix rice flour, corn flour, and black pepper in a bowl
  • beat an egg in another
  • clean squid, you can cut them in rings for bigger squid, remember to remove eyes and beak too
  • dip squid into egg, then flour mix, then deep fry till just a shade before the desired golden brown color
  • set a side these fried squid
cooking instruction 2 (final stage):
  • cut ginger and garlic into slices
  • split red/green chili down the middle and remove seeds
  • heat up a tablespoon of vegetable oil, then fry garlic, ginger, and chili till fragrant
  • add butter, then squid
  • fry for another 1-2 minutes
  • viola, it’s done!

a simple two phase cooking procedure
just a simple two phase cooking procedure

What I really like about this dish is the infusion of butter into the crunchy layer of the squid as well as the fried garlic/ginger. The chili adds a different dimension as well as giving the dish a little bit of a kick. Fresher squid would yield an even better result in my case, but overall the turned out was better than expected.

Check out my other recipes too if you like these style of cooking. Bon appetite!

One of the best things about sharing my food adventures on this site is that I do get a lot of good recommendations from readers. From the previous post on the char kuih teow at Mei Sin kopitiam, missyblurkit commented that I should try their nian gao (kuih bakul, 炸年糕, or fried gold cake), and another reader, May, mentioned that I should try the Ipoh kai si hor fun.

A couple weeks later, I did just that.

fried nian gao at Restaurant Mei Sin
fried nian gao at Restaurant Mei Sin

For those who aren’t familiar with nian gao, also known as Chinese New Year cake, it is prepared from glutinous rice and very generous amount of sugar. It is sweet and sticky, and most consumed during Chinese New Year as the name nian gao 年糕 sounds like 年高, which symbolizes a higher (better) next year.

I love it smacked between layers of sweet potato and yam, and deep fried in batter.

nian gao in between yam and sweet potato, superb with coffee
nian gao in between yam and sweet potato, superb with coffee

The end result is a lethal dose of calorie that is crispy on the outside, firm in between, and soft in the middle. This delicacy is best consumed piping hot, it is mainly sweet, and I think goes best with coffee (even better with Vietnamese coffee).

The same stall also offers other deep fried goodness such as sesame seed ball and banana.

I remember having this first time when I was a small kid back in Penang, from the then famous (or perhaps still) stall located right in front of Island Plaza (of course back then there was no Island Plaza) in Tanjung Tokong. This is the first time I had a good one in KL, any other places offering the same thing?

kai si hor fun at Mei Sin kopitiam
kai si hor fun at Mei Sin kopitiam

The nian gao was of course, the dessert. My main meal for the day was the Ipoh kai si hor fun, and as suggested, I tried the dry version.

It was a pretty simple dish, with hor fun (or kuih teow, if you like) served in some combination of dark/light soya sauce with bean sprout, smooth steamed chicken and plenty of fried garlic on top. It actually tasted good, and I bet would be even better if I ask for thigh next time. (mine came with chicken breast, I don’t like chicken breast)

Mei Sin kopitiam at Jalan Melati, Imbi

Address:
Restaurant Mei Sin
No. 16, Jalan Melati
Off Jalan Imbi,
Kuala Lumpur
GPS3.14396, 101.714768

Nam Yu is one those simple marinating ingredient that is quite rather, magical. Not only it can single handedly make your meat extra tasty, it is also very cheap, easy to store, and versatile (you can use it for porridge).

For the uninitiated, nam yu is the older cousin of fu yu (check out my fuyu pork recipe) – with the distinction that this fermented tofu is red in color instead of white. Nam Yu carries a stronger flavor and is a better candidate for marinate.

namyu pork
nam yu fried pork on a bed of lettuce (for presentation la)

Today lets look at one of my favorite beer foods you can make with nam yu, a recipe that is applicable to both pork and chicken (I prefer chicken wings, but any type of chicken cut will work)

namyu pork cooking steps
marinate, dip in egg white, dip in flour, deep fried, done

Ingredients:

  • pork belly (or ribs, or chicken wings, etc)
  • 3-4 cubes of nam yu
  • black or white pepper to taste
  • 2 egg white
  • flour
  • oil for frying

namyu chicken wings cooking steps
the same recipe works great with chicken wings too

Instructions:

  • marinate pork or chicken with nam yu and pepper for at least 1 hour, the longer the better
  • heat up cooking oil
  • dip the pork/chicken into egg white, then flour (or corn flour) before deep frying

That’s it! The dish is really this simple. The chicken wings you see below is slightly over fried, I suggest frying with medium heat for longer instead of high heat fast to avoid burning the skin.

namyu chicken wings

For those who are too lazy to cook, you can find pretty decent nam yu pork at Pan Heong, near batu caves, they serve some pretty awesome big prawn noodle and wat tan hor too.

Happy eating!

Tonkatsu by Wa Kitchen is one of the latest entries on the 6th floor of Pavilion KL that has lately been on a bit of a revamp. This restaurant is situated right next to Ben’s, another very good lunch option.

Like the name suggest, Tonkatsu serves.. tonkatsu – breaded, deep fried pork cutlets with shredded cabbage and miso soup + rice. To know more there is the wiki entry.

Tonkatsu at Pavilion KL
Tonkatsu at Pavilion KL

Yesterday Suanie happened to drop by KL over lunch time, so I took the opportunity to head there with her since she was in a mood for Japanese food, and I know she isn’t too keen on raw dishes.

The menu is brief enough, there were less than 10 different sets/dishes to choose from. To me this is good, takes away all the extra time spent just to figure out what to eat. (see the paradox of choice)

make  your own condiment, very rich miso soup
make your own condiment, very rich miso soup

I chose the first set, Hire Katsu Zen (RM 29), and suanie opted for set number 3, Hire Katsu + Rosu Katsu zen (RM 28).

First, a server made the fresh condiments for us (later we made more ourselves). Put some sesame in the super mini mortar & pestle, grind it till you can smell the aroma. Then add tonkatsu sauce (or Japanese Worcestershire sauce). Slightly gimmicky, but it actually works. 😀

suanie says hello, imitating baja hitam, only appropriate at a jap restaurant
suanie says hello, baja hitam style, appropriate at a jap restaurant

My set came with 4 pieces of breaded pork tenderloin cutlet (hire katsu), while suanie’s was a mixed of tenderloin and pork loin (hire katsu + rose katsu).

The pork were pretty good, not as good as beef tenderloin of course, but plenty good for a piece of pork that does not involve any big chunk of fat. It was almost healthy too, since they also give free refill of those shredded cabbage.

map to pavilion

Besides several types of deep fried pork cutlets, they also serve pork belly soup, deep fried shrimps and oysters. Shall try more next time!

Address:
Tonkatsu
Lot 6.12.00
Level 6,
Pavilion KL,
Jalan Bukit Bintang, KL.

GPS: 3.148872, 101.713368
Tel: 03-2144 2992

One of my main aim going into the Bangkok trip was to taste some of the weird and wonderful foods the land of smile has to offer, something that is very difficult or impossible to get from Malaysia. This of course, would be the infamous deep fried worms, insects, and alike.

Deep Fried Worms, Insects and Frogs
for a few ringgit, we got all these wonderful snacks

I was expecting fried insect stalls to be on every street corners. In actual fact, they are not very common. We weren’t able to locate anyone selling this for the first couple days of our stay. It was only on the 3rd night at Bangkok that Terence managed to buy a plastic bag full these weird and wonderful food from the streets near Pantip Mall (the one that is famous for selling Amulets, not the IT mall with the same name). Myself and Dree were overjoyed!

Deep Fried Worms, Insects and Frogs
McBugs, McFrogs, and Worm Fries

Inside the goody bag there were worms, crickets, grasshoppers, dragonflies, praying mantis, and of course, those little fried frogs in whole. Not knowing exactly how to start, we first arranged them into McBugs, McFrogs, and Worm Fries combo meal. A couple minutes staring at these creatures, we decided to bite the bullet bugs and go straight to it to get the maximum taste instead.

Deep Fried Worms, Insects and Frogs
having a feast!

I attacked the worms first. I don’t know if they were just worms or some insect larvae, but the slightly yellowish exterior sure looked a lot more inviting than the dark brown insects laying next to them. As it turns out, the worms were actually pretty good, slightly crunchy and tastes a lot better than the bee’s pupae I had in Vietnam. They were seasoned with salt and some spices, I believe.

Deep Fried Worms, Insects and Frogs
my god, we were so proud of ourselves!

Next in line were all the different types of bugs. It was a bit weird chewing down grasshoppers, crickets, and so forth, but actually they too tasted quite ok, very crunchy and tasted a bit like having deep fried small prawns with shells on. Again, it was a little salty and slightly spicy. The different bugs basically tasted the same except but with slightly different textures, you can make out the long arms of praying mantis and the grasshopper’s legs in your mouth, neat.

Deep Fried Worms, Insects and Frogs
naturally we finished the whole serving

The more difficult part of the snack attack session though, were the frogs. Unlike the familiar big fat frogs served in Malaysia, these are tiny frogs the size of fifty sen coins. They come with everything intact except for innards, so you get the whole head, the eyes staring at you, the legs, spines and all.

We threw it into our mouths and start chewing off, amazingly there were actually pretty tasty! Crunchy with slight taste of meat, it goes well with the seasoning and not too salty like the bugs. Once you get over the fact that you have to chew the entire head, it was all good!

Of course, we finished the entire serving and like little kids we just finished their vegetables, we were proud. If you’re going to Thailand, this is a must-have!