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Realized it’s been a while since I last posted anything in Klang Valley, I suppose it’s appropriate to get back on talking about my favorite dish – bak kut teh. This is in fact the 60th such post on this blog, yeap, a bit much perhaps, but someone’s gotta do the job.

Teck Huat Bak Kut Teh, Bandar Baru Klang
Teck Huat Bak Kut Teh, Bandar Baru Klang

Teck Huat bak kut teh is located at Bandar Baru Klang, a stone’s throw away from Aeon Bukit Raja, and less than a couple minutes away from NKVE toll.

If the name rings a bell, it is because the restaurant is operated by the same family that brought the country our very first bowl of bak kut teh, the inventor itself – Teck Teh, and if my information is correct, this is in fact the brother of Teck Seong, one of my other go-to BKT restaurant.

"pua pui chiak", or pork belly meat
“pua pui chiak”, or pork belly meat

Teck Huat offers both standard bowl-type bak kut teh as well as in clay pot depending on your preference. I went with the former and yes, it does carry the signature subtle herbal note with some of the most tender pork texture just like the other Teck’s.

If you like one, you’ll like the other two.

sumptuous breakfast or lunch, take your pick
sumptuous breakfast or lunch, take your pick

Unlike Teck Seong, Teck Huat usually operates till lunch, parking is also a simpler affair at this area, so if you long for some good old fashion bak kut teh, this is certainly a worthy place to visit.

map to teck huat bak kut teh, klang

Address:
Teck Huat Bak Kut Teh
6, Jalan Tiara 4,
Bandar Baru Klang,
41150 Klang, Selangor
GPS: 3.063827,101.463134
Tel: 012-312 8919

In North Borneo, the most often talked about hawker dish by visitors is undoubtedly fish noodle, and justifiably so due to the abundance of great seafood here. However, for the locals, often times a good plate of Tuaran Mee is where it’s at.

Tuaran Mee Restoran, Inanam, Kota Kinabalu
Tuaran Mee Restoran, Inanam, Kota Kinabalu

For those who’re not familiar, Tuaran Mee is a type of noodle originally hailed from Tuaran, the district just north of Kota Kinabalu. The noodle carries a texture that’s unique to its own, which I can only describe as having a springy texture almost but not entirely alike a mixture between yee mee and kolo mee.

I really like it, and think it’s about time someone introduce this to the West Malaysia scene.

Without driving up to Tuaran, one restaurant that offers a unique take on this dish is none other than the aptly named Tuaran Mee Restoran at Inanam, located some 15 minutes away from the city center.

The menu is found hung on the wall and giving diners a choice of noodle that are fried, in soup, or even in claypot. You then pick the different ingredients of choice – seafood, beef, or pork.

seafood Tuaran mee with lehing, love it!
seafood Tuaran mee with lehing, love it!

Most interestingly though, you get to add Lehing, the locally produced alcohol.

For obvious reasons, I had my Tuaran mee with seafood and Lehing, resulting in a dish that had that extra sweetness from the extra dash of forbidden condiment. The seafood was competent, and I thought I really enjoyed the accompanying chili sauce as well. I’d recommend this to anyone.

seafood meehun soup
seafood meehun soup

My lunch partner had meehun soup with seafood that came with plenty of those fresh vegetable that Sabah is known for and reportedly happy with her decision as well. It was a good meal, and I think I’d be back there again hopefully in not too distant future.

tuaran mee restoran map

Address:
Tuaran Mee Restoran
mile 6, Jalan Tuaran, Inanam,
88450 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah
GPS: 5.993625, 116.129537

What’s the similarities between currency exchange and nasi briyani? Well, for one, visiting one of these outlets is always a good idea before heading overseas for any amount of time, and of course, they’re also associated with the Indian Muslim communities in the country.

Nasi Briyani Taste & See, Klang
Nasi Briyani Taste & See, Klang

Briyani rice is often cooked in a big pot and served on a plate, but at Taman Andalas, you’ll find the appropriately named Bamboo Briyani Taste & See doing things a little bit unconventionally, and yep, you guessed it right, the nasi briyani here is cooked in bamboo container.

While lemang is cooked by placing the rice in bamboo over fire, this briyani is prepared by having the rice in bamboo, covered with a piece of banana leave, and then steamed. It is also during this time that the taste of meat and fragrance of briyani rice come together.

bamboo briyani with lamb
bamboo briyani with lamb

The ingredients available includes lamb, chicken, fish, vegetarian, and so forth.

Well, my go-to when it comes to briyani is always lamb, and I’m happy to report that over here they certainly did it right. The lamb was tender, flavorful, and definitely went well with the briyani rice and the curry added to the mix.

bamboo briyani getting ready to be steamed
bamboo briyani getting ready to be steamed

You do also get a bit of salad and some lady’s fingers on the side, which was welcoming, though I was hoping they come with the full compliment of a banana leaf sort of condiments instead.

A portion of lamb briyani is priced at RM 12, while other varieties go for a bit cheaper. Personally, I think it is definitely worth a try for any briyani or even banana leaf rice fan.

simple yet satisfying meal
simple yet satisfying meal

P/S: even the drinks are served in bamboo tubes!

 Bamboo Briyani Taste & See map

Address:
Nasi Briyani Taste & See
16, Jalan Sri Damak 18,
Taman Sri Andalas,
41200 Klang, Selangor
GPS: 3.022304, 101.451550
Hours: Noon to 7pm, closed on Monday

When it comes to Vietnamese food, pho usually gets all the glory, and to be fair, before I stepped foot on Hanoi, I too did not know the existence of this arguably superior Vietnamese dish – Bun Cha.

Bun Cha Dac Kim, Hanoi
Bun Cha Dac Kim, Hanoi

For those who aren’t familiar, bún chả ( is a dish consists of grilled pork with rice vermicelli,  bún stands rice vermicelli, and chả is pork.

My first taste of this wonderful dish came at Bun Cha Dac Kim in Hanoi, a rather famous joint for this dish and coincidentally situated near where we stay at Ancient Lane Hotel (pretty decent room and situated right at the morning market)

bun cha comes with plenty of vegetables
bun cha comes with plenty of vegetables

At this place, bun cha comes with freshly grilled pork and ground pork soaked in the dipping sauce (or broth) which is made of fish sauce, vinegar, and sugar. The vermicelli is served separately on a plate, and of course there’s plenty of herbs & raw vegetable, as well as those yummy spring roll with crab filling.

You can eat this dish by dipping the vermicelli in those broth and then mix with the pork & vegetable, or alternatively, wrap it the Korean bbq style, either way is not wrong.

mom loves the accompanying spring roll, so did I
mom loves the accompanying spring roll, so did I

The version at Bun Cha Dac Kim was really good, especially with those super spicy chili padi that they have too. We ordered 2 portions for the three of us and that turned out to be plenty enough. If you find yourself at Hanoi, do make sure to treat yourself with Bun Cha!

map to Bun Cha Dac Kim, Hanoi, Vietnam

Address:

21.032290, 105.848179

When it comes to hawker dishes in Sabah, the most famous of them all is none other than north Borneo’s very own version of pork noodle – Sang Nyuk Mian (生肉面), or raw pork noodle in Hakka, the most spoken Chinese dialect this part of Malaysia.

Melanian Sang Yuk Mian, Kota Kinabalu
Melanian Sang Nyuk Mian, Kota Kinabalu

To be honest, the difference between this and the KL version isn’t particularly huge. While pork noodle usually comes with kuih teow, yellow noodle, meehun, or mee suah, sang nyuk mian usually has their own version of noodle that is slightly more refined and perhaps a little closer in texture to Japanese soba.

The other reason this being called the equivalent of “raw pork noodle” is the method in which it’s prepared, usually with raw pork slices and offal made to order, thus ensuring freshness and to retain the soft texture.

There are usually two versions to choose from – “kon lou”, or dry version comes with noodle being mixed in dark sauce and the porky goodness in soup, or soup version having the noodle and porky bits all in the same bowl.

Sang Yuk Mian with extra pork kidney
Sang Nyuk Mian with extra pork kidney

If you find yourself at KK town, one of the places to try out his famous local dish would be at Melanian 3 kopitiam, a short walk away from the city center.

Over here you can get a bowl of Sang Nyuk Mian anywhere from RM 7.50 to RM 11 based on the ingredients – pork slices, kidney, tendon, liver, pork ball, intestine, and even heart.

pork kidney, liver, intestine, pork ball, meat slices
pork kidney, liver, intestine, pork ball, meat slices

I had mine with extra pork kidney but otherwise a standard dry version with inclusion of liver, intestine, pork slices, and pork ball.

The soup was more subtle but still sweet and flavorful, and true to its intention, the meat & offal were fresh and soft, but above all, I really like the texture of the noodle used in this version compared to KL’s. Definitely something to try when you find yourself in KK.

map to Melanian Sang Nyuk Mian, Kota Kinabalu

 

Address:
Melanian Sang Nyuk Mian
21, Lorong Lintas Square, Lintas Plaza,
88300 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah
GPS: 5.984318, 116.076363
Hours: 6:30 am to 4:30 pm daily