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Category / soup

When I was young, we made it a point to have a soup dish in every meal, in retrospect, I guess that’s a great way to have kids having enough liquid in our diet?

Anyway,  I remember that one of my favorites of such soup dishes were the salted fish bone tofu and pork soup.  So when I was at Kota Kinabalu not too long ago, I made it a point to get myself some good quality whole kurau salted fish that includes the boney bits.

So here’s the recipe I got from mom.

salted fish bone tofu

Ingredients:

  • salted fish bone (preferably ikan kurau)
  • a bulb of garlic, peeled
  • an inch of garlic, sliced
  • spring onion, cut into 2 inches length
  • pork slices, 300-500 gram
  • tofu, 2 blocks
  • 2 liter of water
  • 4-5 tablespoon cooking oil

Instructions:

  • soak fish bone for half an hour
  • fry garlic, ginger and fish bone till fragrant
  • add pork slices and brown the exterior
  • add water and bring to boil for at least half hour
  • add tofu for the last minute, add spring onion too

Comfort food for rainy days for sure!

Yet another day of cooking at home, and today let’s look at one of my childhood favorites – salted vege soup with tofu and pork slices, one of the simplest traditional Chinese soup to prepare, and yet wholesome and fit for those rainy days.

salted vege soup homecooked

Ingredients:

  • salted vege (I used pickled mustard green, you can use others too)
  • soft tofu
  • pork slices
  • tomato

Instructions:

  • soak salted vege for 30 minutes in water, remove after
  • boil salted vege, tomato, and pork slices in low heat for at least 30 minutes
  • add tofu in the last minute or two
  • season with salt (if it’s still not salty enough) and pepper

Now isn’t that simple?

For more of my kitchen creations, check out my recipes here.

When I was young, mom always made sure that there’ll be one soup dish in every meal. Usually it’s something like.. 1 meat, 1 vege, 1 soup, balanced diet, like it should be.

One of the easiest and fastest soup to cook would be bayam, a vegetable that can be obtained rather cheaply here in Malaysia. So here goes my simple recipe of the day – bayam soup with ikan bilis.

bayam soup homecooked

Ingredients:

  • a handful of ikan bilis  (dried anchovies)
  • a few bulb of garlic
  • some wolf-berry
  • bayam vegetable
  • 1.5 liter of water

Instructions:

  • Boil ikan bilis + garlic + wolf berry for 30 minutes
  • Add bayam for 1 minute
  • Add salt to taste, maybe some pepper
  • Ready to serve,  additionally you can also stir and egg or two prior to serving for extra protein

There are some recipes calling for discarding the anchovies, but I believe in not wasting perfectly fine food, especially since I bought these from Kota Kinabalu’s Filipino market, which is of pretty decent quality.

Check out more simple recipe here.

Here’s another simple soup that I like to make,  usually as a secondary dish to go with rice and maybe another meat/seafood dish. Another benefit with napa cabbage (or Chinese cabbage), is that you can keep it fresh in fridge for quite a number of days.

Here goes.

napa cabbage soup homecooked

Ingredients:

  • Napa cabbage (1/2)
  • a handful of ikan bilis (dried anchovies)
  • 2-3 cloves of garlic
  • 2 eggs
  • 6-8 cups of water
  • 1 tablespoon of cooking oil

Cooking Instructions:

  • heat up cooking oil in the pot and fry anchovies and garlic till fragrant (1-2 mins)
  • add water, bring to boil for 10 mins
  • add cabbage, then add eggs, scrambled, boil for 3-4 minutes
  • ready to serve!

Simple soup dish with plenty of fiber and some protein to boot.

Check out more simple recipe here.

While fusion food has gotten a bit of a bad rep over the years from many restaurants that came up with dishes that were neither here nor there, I still always applaud those who dare to imagine and come up with something different from the ordinary. Sometimes it is done by mixing ingredients from different parts of the world, other times by turning traditional recipes upside down. Either way, it is one way to ensure that culinary art does not stay stagnant and only look backwards.

glorious miso grilled hake steak with spicy mussel soup
glorious miso grilled hake steak with spicy mussel soup

Several days ago I received some fresh ingredients courtesy of the Zealand Trade Enterprises, and as part of the challenge, we were supposed to use them and come up with dishes worthy of sharing. Since cooking is one of my many hobbies, here goes!

For dinner last Friday, I decided to make grilled hake (or any cod, really)  with miso marinate & vege, while the wife came up with spicy mussle soup as a companion dish. Both seafood ingredients were New Zealand products.

Hake steak from New Zealand, miso as main marinate ingredient
Hake steak from New Zealand, miso as main marinate ingredient

I will be sharing the hake steak recipe here:

Ingredients:

  • Hake steak (or any white fish, such as cod) 250-300 gram per pax
  • asparagus & mushroom (sliced)
  • a few gloves garlic
  • 2 tablespoon cooking oil

Ingredients for marinate:

  • 2 tablespoon miso paste
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup cooking sake
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil

asparagus and mushroom as sides
asparagus and mushroom as sides

Cooking instructions (fish):

  • mix marinate in a bowl and apply generously on fish, let marinate for at least 15-30 minutes
  • heat up the oven to 175 C
  • pan fry the fish for 2-3 minutes
  • bake fish in oven for 10 minutes

fish: pan fry before oven, vege: sauteed
fish: pan fry before oven, vege: sauteed

Cooking instructions (vegetable):

  • heat up frying pan with cooking oil
  • fry garlic till fragrant
  • add mushroom & asparagus and saute for 2 minutes
  • add leftover marinate to the vege and continue to saute for another 2 minutes

Time your cooking of vegetable to coincide with the fish so that they’re both served hot. Enjoy!

spicy New Zealand mussel soup made by Haze Long
spicy New Zealand mussel soup made by Haze Long

Since we lack tomato puree or white wine, the spicy mussel soup involved the use of sake, ketchup, New Zealand mussels, and black magic. My wife made it, so I don’t think I’m qualified to know enough of the recipe to share it here.

Happy cooking! #