Kyspeaks.com

Malaysian Food Blog, Travel, Diving & More

Category / Cooks

When it comes to steaks, quality of cut is often directly correlated with satisfaction in eating them, and unfortunately, so is the asking price. To “solve” this problem, sous vide is often the most recommended solution – cook the beef in a slow and controlled temperature, and you’ll get almost any cut to be tender.

Sounds good, right? But here’s the catch – sous vide machines can be very pricey, and I’m not about to spend upwards of RM 1,000 – 2,000 without really knowing what I get myself into.

Enter McGyver inspired cooler-box sous vide solution. (well, I actually read this from another website)

all you need is a thermometer and a cooler box
all you need is a thermometer and a cooler box

For this method, you only need the following 3 crucial items

  • cooler box
  • ziplock bag (freezer type recommended as they’re usually stronger)
  • cooking thermometer

Now let’s look at how to make your own sous vide beef & chicken.

sous vide steak, medium rare, done in an hour or so
sous vide steak, medium rare, done in an hour or so

Instructions:

  • season your meat with salt and pepper, or any other desired seasoning
  • place them in zip lock bags
  • prepare hot water 2-3 Celsius above your desired internal temperature for the meat (example: slightly less than 60 C for medium rare beef, 75-80 Celsius for chicken)
  • lower the meat-bags and shake off excess air pockets before zip locking it
  • monitor every half an hour, if temperature drop below desired level, add hot water to bring it up
  • let the meat cook for an hour or two, depending on the thickness

sous vide chicken breast is surprisingly good on salad
sous vide chicken breast is surprisingly good on salad

  • use the thermometer to ensure that internal meat temperature is appropriate
  • for beef, heat up skillet (I use an IKEA one) to high temperature, then sear for a minute on each side before serving, a blow torch will do similar wonder for chicken breasts
  • add your side dishes, and eat away!

The results we got were amazing. Relatively cheap cuts of grass fed beef had the texture not entirely unlike tenderloin, and for the first time in my life, I actually enjoyed chicken breasts as it came out succulent and moist.

Will do it again!

One of my favorite canned food is the stewed canned pork. It is basically savory heaven contained within a can that can be unleashed upon in the kitchen at your convenience throughout the clock. If I had to build a nuclear bunker, this will definitely be one of the stocked up item for me.

Today, I’m going to share with you one of the easiest ways to make use of this godsend ingredient – by making canned stew pork with potato dish that goes very well with steamed rice.

cooking potato with canned pork
cooking potato with canned pork

Ingredients:

  • one canned stew pork (big)
  • 3 potatoes, cut in 1/2 cm thick slices
  • 2-3 cloves of garlic, smashed
  • 1 tablespoon cooking oil
  • 1 tablespoon dark soya sauce (optional)

potato with stewed pork
potato with stewed pork

Cooking instructions:

  • boil the potato until soft
  • heat up cooking oil and fry garlic until fragrant
  • add canned pork, add potato
  • add dark soya sauce (optional)
  • mix well and serve while hot

This dish can be prepared in less than 20 minutes, super simple and positively delicious. Give it a try if you like some of those homey cholesterol laden taste.

Happy cooking!

While we’ve been cooking more at the new house, I’ve been somewhat neglecting updates on writing about the food we’ve been cooking. Well, here’s one that I made several weeks back that should be easy for anyone who knows how to light the stove – a simple mushroom and prawn fried rice dish.

home cooked mushroom and prawn fried rice
home cooked mushroom and prawn fried rice

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 cups of rice (cooked & cooled)
  • 6-8 medium prawn, peeled
  • 2 eggs
  • half a yellow onion, chopped
  • a handful of mushroom, sliced
  • 3 tablespoon cooking oil
  • half a clove of garlic, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon dark soya sauce
  • 1/2 tablespoon soya sauce
  • salt & pepper to taste
  • chili & some basil (optional)

fry the ingredients one by one, and eggs last
fry the ingredients one by one, and eggs last

Cooking Instruction:

  • prepare all ingredients and place on the side
  • heat 2 tablespoon cooking oil and fry garlic and onion till it starts to fragrant
  • add mushroom, then prawns a minute later
  • add rice once prawns starts to cook, stir and add sauces
  • part the rice in the center, add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil, then add eggs
  • stir everything till egg is cooked
  • add greens on top and viola, you have a plate of awesome fried rice!

This is a complete meal in a dish, add sambal for extra kick.

One of the many wonderful dishes that mom makes when we were a kid involves fatty pork and meehun, and whenever she cooked them, we would finish it in record time. The succulent and overly savory pork with those soft vermicelli never disappoint, and I’m glad to say that I finally manage to do it at our own kitchen.

I present to you – fried meehun with canned stew pork, the sin food.

ingredients - meehun, vege, garlic, canned pork, chili padi
ingredients – meehun, vege, garlic, canned pork, chili padi

The ingredients are plenty simple and should be available from just about anywhere in the world with an Asian/Chinese grocery store.

Ingredients:

  • canned stew pork
  • choi sam (or any leafy vegetable)
  • half a clove of garlic
  • chili padi if you like it spicy
  • mushroom (optional)
  • 2 tablespoon cooking oil
  • soya sauce to taste
  • dark soya sauce (1 teaspoon)

fry the greens first
fry the greens first, then the pork

Cooking Instructions:

  • soak meehun in water for 30 minutes (or until soft)
  • heat up the cooking oil and fry garlic until fragrant
  • add vegetables (always add the stems first as they take longer to cook) and cook for a couple minutes
  • add canned pork and stir for a minute
  • add meehun, chili padi, soya sauce, and dark soya sauce
  • stir, and close the lid of frying pan for a minute to steam and avoid losing too much moisture
  • serve while hot!

add some soya sauce & dark soya sauce, then steam it a bit
add some soya sauce & dark soya sauce, then steam it a bit

The recipe is fairly simple and you really can’t go wrong. A big can of stew pork is probably good enough for four portions of meehun, do use appropriately sized frying pan for this job. We cooked for only 2 of us so the amount of pork we ended up consuming was a bit too insane.

fried mihun with canned stew pork, mom's recipe
fried mihun with canned stew pork, mom’s recipe

Happy cooking, and feel free to check out other recipes on this space too.

Continuing with another cooking recipe since we’ve been actively cooking more at the new house, here’s how I made my version of clams with superior soup, a pretty traditional style of making clam that is pretty simple and yet tastes mighty good so long as the clams are juicy and fresh.

You can use lala or clams for this, do make sure they’re fresh and alive. Soak the clams in salt water for at least an hour or so to let it “spit out” any mud/sand, then rinse them thoroughly before cooking.

fresh clams, and the ingredients for superior soup
fresh clams, and the ingredients for superior soup

Ingredients:

  • 1kg clams
  • 3-4 pieces of tongkuai
  • few small pieces of dried scallops
  • 2 teaspoon wolf berries
  • 1/2 bulb of garlic
  • 5-6 slices of ginger
  • 5-6 chili padi
  • 2-3 cups water or soup stock
  • 1 tablespoon cooking oil

soup cooked separately, then fry the garlic, ginger & chili first
soup cooked separately, then fry the garlic, ginger & chili first

Cooking instructions:

  • boil water with tongkwai, wolfberry, and dried scallops, use soup stock if available
  • heat up cooking oil and fry garlic, ginger, and chili padi till fragrant
  • add clams and fry for a minute
  • add above prepared “soup”, and boil till all clams are opened
  • add some salt for seasoning

While the above pictures look pretty nice, the dish was a bit of a failure due to the clams we bought being not particularly fresh, I cannot stress enough that you really need good quality clam for this dish.

Happy cooking!