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Malaysian Food Blog, Travel, Diving & More

Monthly Archives / June 2021

While Kimchi Jjigae (Korean kimchi soup) is the most popular Korean soup dish, my personal favorite has always been the little sibling of it – Sundubu Jjigae, or the Korean Spicy Tofu Stew.

Sundubu Jjigae is often made with unpressed tofu, with onion, mushroom, and seafood or pork. It is a whole pot of goodness with everything you can ask for in terms of texture, taste, and nutrition, the only way to make this better is to have it at somewhere cold, like Genting or Cameron highland.

Here’s my way of making this dish, I use a Chinese clay pot for the purpose but you can easily use a normal pot for this.

Korean spicy tofu soup in a claypot
Korean spicy tofu soup in a clay pot

Ingredients for 2-3 pax:

  • a handful of seafood – prawns, scallops, or mussels (you can also use pork/chicken)
  • 2 tubes of tofu
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 an onion, sliced
  • a handful of tofu, sliced
  • 4-5 bulbs of garlic, chopped
  • 1/2 cup of kimchi (optional)
  • spring onion, chopped (optional)
  • gochujang – 1.5 tablespoon
  • cooking oil – 1 tablespoon
  • Korean chili powder – 1 teaspoon (optional)

Cooking Instructions:

  • Heat up cooking oil and start frying garlic until slightly fragrant
  • add seafood, then onion & mushroom and stir for a minute
  • add soup stock or water and bring to boil
  • add kimchi, gochujang, and chili powder
  • boil the pot for the next 5-10 minutes until texture is to your liking
  • add tofu for the last minute
  • crack and egg and add spring onion just before serving

I use a claypot for this spicy tofu soup recipe
I use a claypot for this spicy tofu soup recipe

If you’re a fan of this dish, now you know how to make it at home! Pretty simple really and the only “special” ingredient is perhaps gochujang, but you can substitute for it as well.

Enjoy and happy cooking!

Prior to moving to Shah Alam (closer to Klang), I was under the impression that Klang has great bak kut teh, some excellent seafood, and that’s about it.

Little did I know Klang actually does offer some unique hawker fare, some of which aren’t found anywhere else. My favorite is the Klang style “Red Wine Mee Suah“. A quotation mark is warranted cos the wine is actually “yellow wine” if you can read in Chinese.. but for some reasons the dish is called red wine mee suah instead.

mee suah, minced pork, "yellow" wine, ginger, flour
mee suah, minced pork, “yellow” wine, ginger, flour

Not to be confused with fuchow red wine mee suah that uses red yeast rice wine (红槽) and chicken, the Klang style uses another type of Chinese rice wine that’s often called “yellow wine” (黃酒), which carries a much higher alcohol content, in the case of my version – 28%.

I couldn’t find a recipe for this dish online, so the next best thing is to just to “reverse engineer” it, so here’s my version that I thought turned out pretty well. Enjoy!

Ingredients:

  • 1-2 inches of ginger (old is better)
  • minced meat – enough to make 4-5 meat balls per bowl
  • Chinese “yellow” wine  (same as those used to make yellow wine chicken), roughly 28% alcohol content
  • meesuah
  • soup stock, or water + chicken cube
  • poached or sous vide onsen egg (optional)
  • some cooking oil
  • salt & pepper
  • cornstarch

Klang style red wine (or yellow wine?) mee suah
Klang style red wine (or yellow wine?) mee suah

Cooking Instructions:

  • cut ginger into thin slices & fry them until crispy, set aside
  • mix cornstarch, salt & pepper to minced meat & make into balls
  • boil soup stock & cook meatballs for 2 minutes
  • add meesuah for 30-45 seconds
  • remove from pot & put in bowl
  • add 2 caps of rice wine to each serving
  • add fried ginger & eggs to finish up the dish

If you don’t eat pork, other meat substitute can be used as well. Enjoy!

While doing grocery yesterday, I spotted some big and juicy looking shellfish available, and immediately reminded myself of those delicious steamed lala in New Boston Restaurant, a dish that I missed in terms of taste, but not so much in terms of wait time..

So naturally, I decided to get me some of those lala and attempt to recreate the same dish at home. I think I came pretty close, so here’s the recipe to share with everyone.

steamed lala as inspired by New Boston restaurant, Klang
steamed lala as inspired by New Boston restaurant, Klang

Ingredients:

  • lala – soak them in salt water for at least 1/2 hour to reduce chances of hanging sand/mud
  • ginger, julienne, as much as you want, old & hot= better
  • garlic, half a bulb, chopped finely
  • chili padi – chopped
  • Chinese rice wine

garlic, ginger, and cilipadi are crucial
garlic, ginger, and cilipadi are crucial

Cooking instructions:

  • fry garlic with oil until golden, set aside
  • steamed lala with ginger, cilipadi, and a couple tablespoon of Chinese rice wine
  • steamed only until shellfish are opened, this only takes a couple minutes or so
  • put fried garlic on top, add a bit of salt if preferred
  • served while hot!

The result turns out pretty well, could perhaps improved with better quality of Chinese rice wine, but so long as the seafood is fresh, results won’t be disappointing. Try it!

Simple cooking video below.

 

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While durian is the king of fruit, and we are well familiar with the different type of avocados, many of us may not be aware of the little hidden gem from the smallest state in Malaysia when it comes to tropical fruits – the harum manis mangoes from Perlis.

Harum Manis Mango from Perlis
Harum Manis Mango from Perlis

Haram Manis, or Harumanis, literally translate to aromatic & sweet, which also perfectly describe the characteristics of these mangoes in its simplest form. The mango has a distinctive shape, quite round, plum, and have a small pointed rear.

The fruit is meaty with a rather thin seed in the middle, almost devoid of those pesky fibers, making it very smooth, silky, and even milky in texture. It also tastes very sweet with almost no hint of sourness typical of normal mangoes, yet carries a strong mango fragrance that rewards the senses in every bite. It is simply the best mango I’ve ever tried.

usually sold in 3kg boxes
usually sold in 3kg boxes

With such accolades & relative small production (only one season per year) from the smallest state in Malaysia, these fruits don’t come cheap. They’re usually sold around RM 100 for a lot of 3kg (2021 price), which you can expect about 5-6 fruits.

The box itself stated the time/date of harvest, with the expected date for best consumption as well. Follow that, or wait until you can smell the aroma beaming out from the fruits itself before cutting them up, you won’t regret.

I had this box shipped to me by my brother who works in Perlis, awesome fruit gift! Thanks bro! Nowadays you can get them from many online retailers shipped basically to anywhere in Malaysia.

What are some of your favorite local fruits that are less “popular”?